Reading Response: Deborah Bright

Deborah Bright reviewed the depiction of the American landscape.  Whether noble, picturesque, sublime or mundane, the landscape image bears and intense and lasting cultural imprint.  She explained the historical and social significance of the choices or an artist and how, whatever its aesthetic merits, every representation of landscape is also a record of human values and actions imposed on the land over time.  I am really compelled by that because I think the things we create are deeply connected to our values whether we know it or not.  Bright explained that beyond the personal level they reflect collect collective interests and influences, including political, economic, and social values.  That is interesting because sometimes we are unaware of the plethora of influence that surround us daily.

It was interesting to read about the questions she posed about the types of ideologies landscape photographs explore. Who are they creating for?  Why do we still make them?  And why is it so masculine dominated?

 

Reading Response: Deborah Bright

Deborah Bright reviewed the depiction of the American landscape.  Whether noble, picturesque, sublime or mundane, the landscape image bears and intense and lasting cultural imprint.  She explained the historical and social significance of the choices or an artist and how, whatever its aesthetic merits, every representation of landscape is also a record of human values and actions imposed on the land over time.  I am really compelled by that because I think the things we create are deeply connected to our values whether we know it or not.  Bright explained that beyond the personal level they reflect collect collective interests and influences, including political, economic, and social values.  That is interesting because sometimes we are unaware of the plethora of influence that surround us daily.

It was interesting to read about the questions she posed about the types of ideologies landscape photographs explore. Who are they creating for?  Why do we still make them?  And why is it so masculine dominated?

 

Reading Responses

Pg. 381-427

            This section talked about digital manipulations.  How to rescale and resize, adjust resolution, contrast and tone. It talked about how to adjust in in photoshop but also how to manipulate those things in the darkroom.  It explained levels and curves.  Digital and analogue burning and dodging.  Color adjustments and hand coloring.

Reading Responses

Theory B: Text and Image:           

            This part talked about how text and image are “connected but irreconcilable ways of delivering information.”  Text adds voice, because as Duane Michals said we are story tellers not truth tellers which I think is a fascinating distinction, especially considering photography is often viewed as a realistic documentation means; it is seen as visual testimony.  The question was posed, what is doing the illustrating? The image or the text?  It also addressed photography in selling and marketing.

 

Reading Responses

Theory 4A: Series and Sequence, part II

This section discussed the process of documenting artistic processes as with respect to performance art or journalistic work: how do you capture something ephemeral like that?  The history was really interesting, how before photography became an accepted gallery art form photos were displayed in books which is a traveling vehicle for art.  That is a different dimension that I never thought about before.  It talked about slide shows and timelapse and how they have changes as technology has increased.